Tips for Radicals

Aiming to be a "blog of the gaps" to cover things that other radical blogs often miss — what we want, our journey there, and issues along the way.

To help you searching the blog, I use the following tags to categorise posts:

  • theory - ways of structuring the world
  • strategy - plans to achieve the theories
  • tools - specific ways to (help) achieve the strategy
  • tips - advice that could help you in your life and action
  • examples and analysis of existing campaigns

For more info, see the about this blog page.

Please send in your own blog posts, links, comments, or article ideas either as a submission or an ask - always welcome.
"if you don't have a strategy, you're part of someone else's strategy."
– a. toffler

"What can we do today, so that tomorrow we can do what we are unable to do today?"
– Paulo Freire


I also run a more scatter-shot blog full of incoherent rants and tumblr arguments. Sorry about that.

Recent Tweets @tipsforradicals
An owie to one is an owie to all: a seven-step plan for helping your parent-friends remain activists
Radical parents may feel isolated at mainstream places (like their children’s schools), so imagine how it must feel to also be isolated by your own networks and culture. Here are a few steps you can take to really get your support on:
Childcare in meetings. This is not sufficient on its own! Consider fundraising to pay for external childcare so everyone can attend the meetings who wants to.
Be flexible to different children and different parents. Parents may want to bring kids to meetings and have them in the same room, have them in a different room but still bring them, leave them at home with toys, or something else…
…so you don’t need a childcare room necessarily, just people willing to occupy the kids when the event’s going on. Even just talking to kids occasionally and taking them for a walk if they get bored is useful.
Don’t expect parents to just be comfortable giving you their child. Talk to them in advance about useful management methods and build up a relationship with the kids.

Offer meals to parents when they arrive.
Help parents with lifts/rides to meetings.
Have parenting supplies on hand at meetings e.g. spare nappies/diapers, snacks for parents etc.
Have childcare at events that aren’t meetings too!
Visit the childcare venue! It can be pretty isolating to run.

Don’t expect too much of new parents. They may not be able to engage with your group in the same way as they used to, but they may be able to engage in new ways that fit better into their new lives.
Include kids in all activities you can e.g. creative workshops, bike rides.
h/t to parenting support lists on Libcom and Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind (which also has a 22-page handout).

An owie to one is an owie to all: a seven-step plan for helping your parent-friends remain activists

Radical parents may feel isolated at mainstream places (like their children’s schools), so imagine how it must feel to also be isolated by your own networks and culture. Here are a few steps you can take to really get your support on:

  1. Childcare in meetings. This is not sufficient on its own! Consider fundraising to pay for external childcare so everyone can attend the meetings who wants to.
    • Be flexible to different children and different parents. Parents may want to bring kids to meetings and have them in the same room, have them in a different room but still bring them, leave them at home with toys, or something else…
    • …so you don’t need a childcare room necessarily, just people willing to occupy the kids when the event’s going on. Even just talking to kids occasionally and taking them for a walk if they get bored is useful.
    • Don’t expect parents to just be comfortable giving you their child. Talk to them in advance about useful management methods and build up a relationship with the kids.
  2. Offer meals to parents when they arrive.
  3. Help parents with lifts/rides to meetings.
  4. Have parenting supplies on hand at meetings e.g. spare nappies/diapers, snacks for parents etc.
  5. Have childcare at events that aren’t meetings too!
    • Visit the childcare venue! It can be pretty isolating to run.
  6. Don’t expect too much of new parents. They may not be able to engage with your group in the same way as they used to, but they may be able to engage in new ways that fit better into their new lives.
  7. Include kids in all activities you can e.g. creative workshops, bike rides.

h/t to parenting support lists on Libcom and Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind (which also has a 22-page handout).